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22 March 2011

Syllabus Economics Cambridge

 

Syllabus





Cambridge IGCSE Economics
Syllabus code 0455

























For examination in June and November 2011

Note for Exams Officers : Before making Final Entries, please check availability of the codes for the components and options in the E3 booklet (titled “Procedures for the Submission of Entries”) relevant to the exam session. Please note that component and option codes are subject to change.

Contents

Cambridge IGCSE Economics Syllabus code 0455



1.  Introduction .....................................................................................2

1.1 Why choose Cambridge?
1.2 Why choose Cambridge IGCSE Economics?
1.3 Cambridge International Certificate of Education (ICE)
1.4 How can I find out more?


2. . Assessment at a glance ..................................................................5


3.  Syllabus aims and assessment .......................................................6
3.1 Aims
3.2 Assessment objectives and their weightings weightings
3.3 Exam combinations


4.  Syllabus content ..............................................................................9
4.1 Basic economic problem: choice and the allocation of resources \
4.2 The allocation of resources: how the market works; market failure
4.3 The individual as producer, consumer and borrower
4.4 The private firm as producer and employer
4.5 Role of government in an economy
4.6 Economic indicators
4.7 Developed and developing economies: trends in production, population and living standards  
4.8 International aspects


5.  Appendix: Grade descriptions ....................................................... 13









1. . Introduction

1.1 Why choose Cambridge?

University of Cambridge International Examinations (CIE) is the world's largest provider of international University of Cambridge International Examinations (CIE) qualifications. Around 1.5 million students from 150 countries enter Cambridge examinations every year. What makes educators around the world choose Cambridge?

Recognition

Cambridge IGCSE is internationally recognised by schools, universities and employers as equivalent to UK IGCSE.. Cambridge IGCSE is excellent preparation for A/AS Level, the Advanced International Certificate of Cambridge Education (AICE), US Advanced Placement Programme and the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma..
Learn more at www.cie.org.uk/recognition .

Support

CIE provides a world-class support service for teachers and exams officers. We offer a wide range of teacher materials to Centres, plus teacher training (online and face-to-face) and student support materials. Exams officers can trust in reliable, efficient administration of exams entry and excellent, personal from CIE Customer Services. Dari CIE Layanan Pelanggan. Learn more at www.cie.org.uk/teachers . Excellence in education Cambridge qualifications develop successful students. They not only build understanding and knowledge required for progression, but also learning and thinking skills that help students become independent learners and equip them for life. Not-for-profit, part of the University of Cambridge CIE is part of Cambridge Assessment, a not-for-profit organisation and part of the University of Cambridge. CIE. The needs of teachers and learners are at the core of what we do. CIE invests constantly in improving qualifications and services.. We draw upon education research in developing our qualifications.

1.2 Why choose Cambridge IGCSE Economics?

Cambridge IGCSE Economics is accepted by universities and employers as proof of knowledge and understanding of economics.. Successful IGCSE Economics candidates gain lifelong skills, including:
• an understanding of economic theory, terminology and principles
• the ability to apply the tools of economic analysis
• the ability to distinguish between facts and value judgements in economic issues
• an understanding of, and an ability to use basic economic numeracy and literacy
• the ability to take a greater part in decision-making processes in everyday life
• an understanding of the economies of developed and developing
• an excellent foundation for advanced study in economics



1.3 Cambridge International Certificate of Education (ICE)

Cambridge ICE is the group award of the International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE
It requires the study of subjects drawn from the five different IGCSE subject groups.. It gives schools opportunity to benefit from offering a broad and balanced curriculum by recognising the achievements of students who pass examinations in at least seven subjects, including two languages, and one subject from each of the other subject groups. The Cambridge portfolio of IGCSE qualifications provides a solid foundation for higher level courses such as GCE A and AS Levels and the International Baccalaureate Diploma as well as excellent preparation for employment.
A wide range of IGCSE subjects is available and these are grouped into five curriculum areas. Economics
(0455) falls into Group II, Humanities and Social Sciences. (0455) Learn more about ICE at www.cie.org.uk/qualifications/academic/middlesec/ice .

1.4 How can I find out more? 1

If you are already a Cambridge Centre You can make entries for this qualification through your usual channels, eg CIE Direct. If you have any
queries, please contact us at international@cie.org.uk If you are not a Cambridge Centre You can find out how your organisation can become a Cambridge Centre.. Email us at
international@cie.org.uk .Learn more about the benefits of becoming a Cambridge Centre at www.cie.org.uk .

2. 2. Assessment at a glance

Cambridge IGCSE Economics Syllabus code 0455
Candidates will receive grades from A* to G.
Paper 1 Multiple choice
45 minutes
Candidates answer thirty multiple choice questions.
20% of total
Paper 2 Structured questions
2 hours 2 jam
Candidates answer one compulsory question and three questions from a choice of six.
50% of total marks
Paper 3 Analysis and critical evaluation
1 hour 30 minutes
Candidates answer two compulsory questions and are required to interpret and analyse previously unseen data relevant to a real economic situation. 30% of total marks
30% dari total tanda




3. Syllabus aims and assessment

3.1 Aims

The aims of this syllabus describe the educational purposes of a course in economics for the IGCSE exam. The aims are to: Tujuan adalah untuk:
1 develop candidates' knowledge and understanding of economic terminology and principles, and elementary economic theory;
2 develop candidates' basic economic numeracy and literacy and their ability to handle simple data including graphs and diagrams;
3 develop candidates' ability to use the tools of economic analysis in particular situations;
4 show candidates how to identify and discriminate between differing sources of information and how to distinguish between facts and value judgements in economic issues;
5 develop candidates' ability to use economic skills (with reference to individuals, groups and organisations) to understand better the world in which they live;
6 enable candidates to participate more fully in decision-making processes as both consumers and producers and as citizens of the local, national and international community;
7 develop candidates' understanding of the economies of developed and developing nations and of the relationships between them; and to develop their appreciation of these relationships from the perspective of both developed and developing nations.

3.2 Assessment objectives and their weightings

The four assessment objectives in IGCSE Economics are
A: Knowledge with understanding
B: Analysis
C: Judgement and decision-making
D: Critical evaluation..

A: Knowledge with understanding
Candidates should be able to:
1 show knowledge and understanding of economic facts, definitions, concepts, principles and theories;
2 use economic vocabulary and terminology confidently.

3. 3. Syllabus aims and assessment

B: Analysis
Candidates should be able to::
3 select, organise and interpret data; 3
4 apply economic knowledge and understanding in verbal, numerical, diagrammatic, pictorial and graphical form;
5 use economic data, recognise patterns in such data, and determine relationships.



C: Judgement and decision-making
Candidates should be able to::
6 distinguish between evidence and opinion, make reasoned judgements and communicate those judgements in an accurate and logical manner;;
7 recognise that economic theory has various limits and uncertainties;
8 evaluate the social and environmental implications of particular courses of economic action

D: Critical evaluation
Candidates should be able to:
9 draw conclusions from economic information and critically evaluate economic data;
10 communicate conclusions in a logical and concise manner

The weightings given to the assessment objectives are:
Assessment objective
Paper 1
(%) 
Paper 2
(%) 
Paper 3 
(%) 
A: Knowledge with understanding
60
20
20
B: Analysis
40
40  
20 2
C: Judgement and decision-making
40
20
D: Critical evaluation
40

The assessment objectives are weighted to give an indication of their relative importance. The weightings are not intended to provide a precise statement of the number of marks allocated to particular assessment objectives.

3. 3. Syllabus aims and assessment
3.3 Exam combinations
Candidates can combine this syllabus in an exam session with any other CIE syllabus, except:
• syllabuses with the same title at the same level
• 2281 O Level Economics
Please note that IGCSE, Cambridge International Level 1/Level 2 Certificates and O Level syllabuses are at the same level..

4. 4. Syllabus content

4.1 Basic economic problem: choice and the allocation of resources
Candidates should be able to:
• define the nature of the economic problem (finite resources and unlimited wants);
• define the factors of production (land, labour, capital, enterprise);
• define opportunity cost and analyse particular circumstances to illustrate the concept;
• evaluate the implications of particular courses of action in terms of opportunity cost


4.2 The allocation of resources: how the market works; market failure
Candidates should be able to:
• describe the allocation of resources in market and mixed economic systems
• demonstrate the principle of equilibrium price and analyse simple market situations with changes in demand and supply;;
• describe the causes of changes in demand and supply conditions and analyse such changes to show effects in the market;;
• define price elasticity of demand and supply and perform simple calculations;
• demonstrate the usefulness of price elasticity in particular situations such as revenue changes, consumer expenditure;
• describe the concept of market failure and explain the reasons for its occurrence;
• evaluate the merits of the market system;
• define private and social costs
1 1
and benefits and discuss conflicts of interest in relation to these
and benefits in the short term and long term through studies of the following issues:
• conserving resources versus using resources;
• public expenditure versus private expenditure..
1 1
Social costs are equal to the sum of private costs and extermal costs.


4.3 The individual as producer, consumer and employer
Candidates should be able to:
• describe the functions of money and the need for exchange;
• describe the functions of central banks, stock exchanges, commercial banks;
• identify the factors affecting an individual's choice of occupation (wage factors and non-wage factors););
• describe likely changes in earnings over time for an individual;
• describe the differences in earnings between different occupational groups (male/female; skilled/ unskilled; private/public; agricultural/manufacturing/services);
• describe trade unions and their role in an economy;
• describe the benefits and disadvantages of specialisation for the individual
• analyse the different motives for spending, saving and borrowing;
• discuss how and why different income groups have different expenditure patterns (spending, saving and borrowing).


4.4 The private firm as producer and employer
Candidates should be able to:
• describe the type of business organisation in the public and private sectors: sole proprietors, partnerships, private companies, public companies, multi-nationals, co-operatives, public corporations;
• describe and evaluate the effects of changes in structure of business organisations;
• describe what determines the demand for factors of production;
• define total and average cost, fixed and variable cost and perform simple calculations
• analyse particular situations to show changes in total and average cost as output changes;
• define total and average revenue and perform simple calculations;
• describe the principle of profit maximisation as a goal;
• describe pricing and output policies in perfect competition and monopoly;
• describe the main reasons for the different sizes of firms (size of market, capital, organisation);
• describe and evaluate integration, economies and diseconomies of scale; • discuss the advantages and disadvantages of monopoly.



4.5 Role of government in an economy  
Candidates should be able to:
• describe the government as a producer of goods and services and as an employer;
• describe the aims of government policies, such as full employment, price stability, economic growth, , redistribution of income, balance of payments stability;
• discuss the possible conflicts between government aims
• describe the types of taxation (direct, indirect, progressive, regressive, proportional) and the impact of taxation;
• discuss the government's influence (regulation, subsidies, taxes) on private producers.



4.6 Economic indicators
With regards to prices candidates should be able to:
• describe how the retail price index is calculated;
• discuss the causes and consequences of inflation. .

With regards to employment candidates should be able to:
• describe the changing patterns and levels of employment;
• discuss the causes and consequences of unemployment.

With regards to output candidates should be able to:

• define Gross Domestic Product (GDP);
• describe simple measures and indicators of comparative living standards, such as GDP per head, Human Development Index (HDI).

4.7 Developed and developing economies: trends in production, population and living standards Candidates should be able to:
• describe why some countries are classified as developed and others are not;
• recognise and discuss policies to alleviate poverty;
• describe the factors that affect population growth (birth rate, death rate, fertility rate, net migration) and
discuss reasons for the different rates of growth in different countries
• analyse the problems and consequences of these population changes for countries at different stages of development;
• describe the effects of changing size and structure of population on an economy;
• discuss differences in living standards within countries and between countries, both developed and developing.



4.8 International aspects
Candidates should be able to:
• describe the benefits and disadvantages of specialisation at regional and national levels;
• describe the structure of the current account of the balance of payments;
• define exchange rates;
• discuss the causes and consequences of exchange rate fluctuations;
• describe methods of protection;
• discuss the merits of free trade and protection.



5. 5. Appendix: Grade descriptions
CIE provides grade descriptions to give a general indication of what a candidate must achieve for a particular grade. The actual grade given to the candidate will depend on how well they have met the assessment objectives overall. A candidate's weakness in one aspect of the exam may be balanced by above average performance in some other aspect.














Grade A
To achieve an A grade, a candidate must show mastery of the curriculum and an outstanding performance on the more academic problems. Within the separate assessment objectives, a candidate awarded an A grade must show:
A: Knowledge with understanding
• an excellent ability to identify detailed facts and principles in relation to the content of the syllabus;
• an excellent ability to describe clearly graphs, diagrams, tables;
• a thorough ability to define the concepts and ideas of the syllabus.
B: Analysis
• an excellent ability to classify and comment on information;
• an ability to apply this information in a logical and well-structured manner to illustrate the application of economic analysis to a particular situation. analisis ekonomi untuk situasi tertentu.

C: Judgement and decision-making

• a sound ability to discriminate between complex and varied sources of information and to distinguish clearly between facts and opinions; jelas antara fakta dan pendapat;
• a sound ability to make clear, reasoned judgements and to communicate them in an accurate andlogical manner. secara logis.
D: Critical evaluation
• a thorough ability to classify and order information;
• a sound ability to form conclusions from this information and to demonstrate these conclusions clearly and logically.

Grade C

To achieve a C grade, a candidate must show a good understanding of the curriculum and some ability to answer questions that are pitched at a more academic level. Within the separate assessment objectives, a candidate awarded a C grade must show:
A: Knowledge with understanding
• a sound ability to identify detailed facts and principles in relation to the content of the syllabus;
• a sound ability to describe clearly graphs, diagrams, tables;
• a sound ability to define the concepts and ideas of the syllabus.
B: Analysis
• an ability to use and comment on information in a non-verbal as well as a verbal manner;
• an ability to apply this information to illustrate the application of economic analysis to a particular situation.
C: Judgement and decision-making
• an ability to discriminate between more complex information and to distinguish clearly between facts and opinions;
• an ability to evaluate and make reasoned judgements.

D: Critical evaluation
• an ability to use evidence accurately and draw conclusions;
 • an ability to present conclusions in a clear manner, using appropriate methods.

Grade F
To achieve an F grade, a candidate must show some familiarity with the central concepts and ideas in thecurriculum.. Within the separate assessment objectives, a candidate awarded an F grade must show:
A: Knowledge with understanding
• some ability to identify specific facts or principles in relation to the content of the syllabus;
• kemampuan untuk mengidentifikasi beberapa fakta atau prinsip-prinsip tertentu dalam kaitannya dengan isi silabus;
• some ability to describe graphs, diagrams, tables.
 • kemampuan untuk menjelaskan beberapa grafik, diagram, tabel.
B: Analysis
• some ability to classify data in a simple way and some ability to select relevant information from a set of data;
• some ability to apply the tools of economic analysis to particular situations.

C: Judgement and decision-making
• a limited ability to discriminate between different sources of information and to describe the
difference between facts and opinions..
D: Critical evaluation
• some ability to use information relating to a particular topic and to draw some basic conclusions.



University of Cambridge International Examinations
1 Hills Road, Cambridge, CB1 2EU, United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0)1223 553554 Fax: +44 (0)1223 553558
Email: international@cie.org.uk Website: www.cie.org.uk © University of Cambridge International Examinations 2008
Teks asli berbahasa Inggris:
1 develop candidates' knowledge and understanding of economic terminology and principles, and
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